Let’s Get Cultured- Introducing the Best Fermented Foods Book Yet

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Miso Ramen
Miso Ramen (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Hey Bliss Bombs,

I’m so excited to share the release of this awesome new fermented foods book with you. I had the grand opportunity of contributing recipes alongside experts, health advocates and chefs like Donna Gates and Kevin Gianni.

The book, “Cultured: Make Healthy Fermented Foods at Home” boasts recipes like watermelon kimchi, homemade -miso, kombucha, and the healthiest of chocolates, kefirs and MORE. Plus, this stuff seriously tastes great.

But it’s not just about recipes. This is quite possibly the most user-friendly compilation of history, how-to’s and what-for’s on fermented foods I’ve ever read, and I’m so grateful to be a part of it.

Kevin Gianni (editor of this gorgeously delicious) book says that “Fermented Foods May Be the Healthiest, Most Affordable and Easiest to Make Superfoods on the Planet.” And, I couldn’t agree more. You know I love these foods for more than just their taste. They totally helped save our family from autism , candida, acne, seizures, acid reflux and so much more.

For those of you who purchase the book from me, I am offering a half-off special on Body Ecology/Intuitive Eating sessions (phone or skype). That’s $55 for an hour of coaching. The book is only 29.99 (or 39.99), So, it’s as if you are getting the book for free and as well as a discounted session. With the fall season at our fingertips, this is a great time to introduce your body to the releasing and healing power of Body Ecology and Fermented Foods.

Email me at Gina@BlissedLife.com to schedule your private session.

My offer ends 10-11-11

Please let me know if you have any questions about fermented foods and their use in healing your family. I am happy to share.

Here’s your link to the book: http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4452873.
Thanks so much for your support. Your purchases mean that we can continue our mission to heal the world one bite, one buck one leap at a time.
You didn’t think I’d leave you without a recipe, did ya? Never. Check out this one from the book:

Contributed by Shira Locarni (superfoods-for-superhealth.com)


Homemade Garbanzo Miso Recipe

5 cups dried garbanzo beans, soaked overnight (traditional soy is used, see side note*)
1 cup sea salt
3 tbsp unpasteurized miso
5 cups koji
1 cup cooking liquid

Equipment:

A one gallon glass jar or a crock of similar size
Plate, lid or wooden disk that fits snugly inside the jar
Heavy weight or clean rock
Thick cotton cloth to cover everything

Cook the beans until soft. Strain and save 1 cup of the cooking liquid. Allow beans to cool and dry in a strainer for an hour or two. Process beans in a food processor for desired texture.

Dissolve 3/4 cup sea salt into 1 cup cooking liquid to make a brine. Mash the 3 tbsp unpasteurized miso into 1 cup brine. Mix brine (containing salt and 3 tbsp miso) with the koji.

In a big bowl, add processed beans to this brine mixture. This is your miso.

Packing for Fermentation: (I often do this part first while the garbanzos are cooling.)

Wet the sides of the jar slightly with hands dipped in water. Place some salt inside the side of jar, put the lid on or cover, and shake it around, coating all sides and bottom of jar or crock with a salt layer. Pack the miso into the crock/jar with clean hands, press down firmly. Spread a generous layer of salt over the top. Place the flat object on top and put the weight on top of that. Cover with cloth and secure well with a tight rubber band, string or tape.

You have the option to continue the fermentation process, and like with fine wine, it only gets better with time. If you decide to continue fermentation for another year it is good to test it out and repack it again with salt.

Miso years are calculated by the number of summers it has aged. So, if you have gone through one summer of fermentation, then you have one year old miso. I like to start my miso projects in the spring time, so they are ripe and ready to experience the warmer temps of summer when they tend to be more active.

*You can make this recipe using soy beans as well. Just be sure to use organic soy, since there is less chance of genetically modified contamination.

What is koji and where can I find it?

Koji is a Japanese rice on which koji mold spores have been cultivated. This process allows for the fermentation of koji rice, which is the primary ingredient in sake. Although koji spores can be bought, they usually have to be bought from specialty importers. However, fermented koji rice that has already been inoculated with the spores can be found at your local Asian grocery.

Helpful Tips:

It is important that your miso is packed tightly, free from oxidation and protected by the salt layer. The cloth will also help to keep out impurities and unwanted bacteria.

Label your crock/jar with the date. Store the jar in a cellar, basement or other cool, dark spot where it will remain undisturbed. Have patience and ferment for one year. (See “miso years” above.) Open, scrap off top layer and celebrate with family and friends… your very first batch of homemade miso!! It should smell rich and savory like tamari. Pack it in clean, glass jars with plastic lids and refrigerate or store in a cool place.


Get “Cultured” Here http://www.1shoppingcart.com/app/?Clk=4452873.

Namaste,
Gina

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