Fermented Fig Fantasy Dressing Recipe

Do you love figs? I do! And, besides eating them in the wildly delicious gluten-free newtons from the Santa Monica Co-op, I had to figure out what else to do with the things so that my obsession didn’t get boring. Naturally, I went to fermentation. I’ve tried to ferment almost everything you can think of from green beans to chocolate to spice mixes and teas. It’s not always a success. But, this my dears…this figgy frenzy was a fermentation feat for my record book. In fact, I often serve this in my classes and bring it to parties.

Figs are full of sugar, so naturally they have what it takes to feed the healthy probiotics in the fermentation process. Leaving them to ferment for 24 hours doesn’t produce alcohol for me. So, it’s all good. The fermentation simply breaks down the sugar and makes the whole shabang easier to digest, and also offers you some healing pro-bugs for your beautious digestive tract.

Fermentation also makes the minerals and fiber more bioavailable to you. That means that your body will actually accept more nourishment from these delicious fruits in their fermented state.

Figs are very alkalizing and have the energy to help your stomach, spleen and pancreas do their jobs, and get food and fluids moving through and balanced. No wonder why I love them so. I found myself having spleen/stomach problems a while back. Sweet foods have a necessary role in health besides providing us with caloric energy and enjoyment. They can be very supportive and tonifying. Of course, the more figgy love you have, the closer to the bathroom I recommend you stay. The little guys can also be quite a laxative.

If you’re on a candida cleanse or doing Body Ecology, you may feel the need to stray from all sugars. We did that for a while and it worked for us. However, when I started adding in more fermented foods and fermenting salad dressings and stuff like that– our whole family came to be able to process sugar much better. In fact, we also became able to process fats, proteins, and carbs much better too. We no longer think sugar is evil. We like it. And our adventures into fermentation have taken away all of those wicked cravings for the sugar beast.

“Figgy Juice” Recipe

Ingredients and Equipment:

  • 2 cups fresh figs (dried)
  • Coconut kefir to cover figs
  • Sterile Jar

Process:

  • Pack figs in jar and cover with kefir.
  • Ferment for 24 hours.
  • Use “juice” in salad dressings.
  • Figs can be used in desserts or dressings.

Fermented Fig Fantasy Dressing Recipe

Ingredients:

  • Handful fermented figs
  • Splash fermented “figgy juice”
  • Splash ume boshi vinegar
  • Sea salt to taste
  • Handful of chives, cilantro, basil, parsley, sunflower seeds
  • Olive oil

Process:

  • Begin to blend some figs and fig juice and keep adding ingredients until you have a “salad dressing” consistency that floats your boat.

Note: you may also dig adding some fig bits to your chocolates. I do.

Have a gorgeous day,

Gina

Image Credit


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3 thoughts on “Fermented Fig Fantasy Dressing Recipe

  • Gina,
    Thanks for posting this. I picked some figs about 2 weeks ago at a friends house. We a many however the ones we did not eat I placed unwashed in a plastic bag. When I got home I put them in the fridge with the intention of eating them or making fig preserves. Well inevitably I got busy with other things and forgot about them. I went in this morning to make a smoothie and found the bag shoved to the bag of the fridge. I thought for sure they would be moldy however when I opened the bag they looked great. No mold. Some where broken and smashed around a bit but a few were still solid. I took out two of the solid ones and cut them open and they looked great too. I tasted them and they taste slightly fermented. I am frustrated that I did not put them in a glass container. My question is do you think these are still ok and can I move them to a glass jar and just let them naturally ferment on their own?

    • Hey Kathy,

      It’s too hard to tell what bacteria might be in there. Although if it was kept sealed In the fridge, it’s probably okay. If you are very sensitive, I would toss them. If not, I would experiment by adding some probiotic starter and fermenting in a sterile, sealed glass jar, good probiotic culture starters like Body Ecology will also eat up pathogens on the food if there are any.

      I’ve cut mild off of veggies in the past and successfully fermented them. It’s just hard to know exactly what microorganisms are present in the finished product and I wouldn’t want to suggest something that would make you sick. So, use your best judgment, and enjoy!

      Gina

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